Adult Toys

Adult Toys

 

I was lucky enough to spend 10 weeks in Europe last summer. While it was inexplicably educational, it also reminded me of one thing I had forgotten, my childhood. See, kids possess this amazing ability to enjoy themselves – they play. I became all too aware of this concept and the children around me; they had no barriers. I remembered the joy of dreaming of being the best architect designing cities and houses and schools and vineyards. I wanted a house in LA, New York, London, Paris, and Napa.

I exercised those dreams as a kid through sketching and writing - designing the perfect life for myself, but now I’m older and life is happening as I type. I could dream as a kid, but now those dreams have to become actions to make them realities. I am nearing the end of architecture school and this is the time when dreaming seems to die and you become a true adult; childhood is dead. But it’s not dead, only suppressed and that’s what Europe showed me.

Children see the world differently, their ideas and solutions do not hold the gravitas of the truisms of the world. While I’m not saying we should be naive, I do believe that tapping into innate childhood optimism is essential. It’s funny when parents say their kids taught them so much, because the kid is not so much teaching as reminding. I do not have kids, so my reminder comes from a curated pile of toys in my apartment. Each item is placed around my living room so I constantly see them and my guests can’t miss them.

Here are their stories:

It was nearly impossible to leave Prague without a wooden toy... Beckoning me with every storefront I passed it was a ticking clock until I caved. Prague is and was a fairy tale. The streets, the people, and the city all felt surreal. So I bought it, the Prague Puppet. Now its cute face and lovable slinky ring attachment provides my face with the smile it longed for all day.

As does the classic Danish toy, Hoptimist. While perusing my favorite store, Illums Bolighus, I kept gravitating towards these glorified smiley face bobble heads. They were so elegant, so simple, and so fun. I had to have one. It was the perfect reminder of my time in Copenhagen, something I never want to leave behind - the Danish delight that I never want to be without and a home in a toy I can carry with me no matter where I live.

The seesaw piece is a classic childhood memory. It's design is as elegant as it is simplistic - a wonderful and fun reminder to keep around while I design.

Finally, the piece that started it all, the Koons Balloon. The piece is ever evolving. Its hyper polish captures every moment in its range. I see myself reflected in the piece, I see my apartment transformed onto the surface and I see the dog coated in the colors of my mother's painting hung above my couch. The hollow balloon interior is filled with the changing world around it. A huge fan of Jeff Koons and his work, especially this balloon series, I couldn't not hold this in my home.

These "toys" are nothing more than small reminders to enjoy the day. They remind me of special places that re-energized my creativity. They remind me of the passion and drive and happiness that drove me to be in the field I am in. And they are fun...

 
Behind the Hedge

Behind the Hedge

The Public Life of People Sitting

The Public Life of People Sitting