Sheep Meadow

Sheep Meadow

Quick, go quick. Before summer is buried and the fall becomes the windy winter that makes you walk just a little faster from point A to B in the hopes to minimize your time outside.

Central Park hosts a plethora of park space. It has playgrounds, ponds, gargantuan rocks and grass. You can rent a row boat or go to the zoo. You can see buildings at the tips of the treetops just as easily as you can see a clear blue sky with no building in sight.

The park has it all, but one thing it has far less of is big open green spaces. This too is to be said of Manhattan itself. While green space (as hard as it is to believe) is not that difficult to come by, undesignated space is. The piers lining the Hudson have seen major changes, but with each new pier park, comes more designation use of space. In all of this there is one, the most famous, most desired open space in the city ... Sheep Meadow.

The importance of large, green, undesignated spaces in urban environments is quietly not spoken of. Not by way of trying to hide or skirt the topic, they simply aren't pointed out. In Austin, you have Zilker Park. In Berlin, you have Tiergarten. In Copenhagen, Amagerfælled and Fælledparken and Kongens Have. And in Manhattan... Sheep Meadow.

The value in this type of space in an urban environment must be defined. A soccer game can happen in the same moment as a yoga class and a frisbee match. A dog will run to fetch his ball while a child runs aimlessly. You are aware of the happenings of your surroundings, yet they don't seem to directly affect you. Everyone can come to this communal space to do their own thing. As stated precisely by F. Scott Fitzgerald “... I like large parties. They’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy.” Applying the parties he wrote about and seeing them as public spaces it becomes evident that the "privacy" Fitzgerald speaks of is vital to the healthy psyche of urban dwellers.

In heavy urban cities that hardly leave you to yourself these undesignated green spaces become a lifeline to your sanity.

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